Robots

Robots

Zenith (2016)

2016 Robot: Zenith

2016 Robot: Zenith

2016 Robot: Zenith

2016 Robot: Zenith
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For the 2016 game, FIRST Stronghold, 1816's robot features a versatile drive train and a rotating arm with a pneumatic piston to shoot the ball. Our game strategy is to breach 4 out of 5 defenses, including the low bar, and shoot into the high goal. We made a short video, sharing a few insights into Zenith's design: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgtCI7D4cws






Zebruh (2015)

2015 Robot, Zebruh

2015 Robot, Zebruh

2015 Robot, Zebruh

2015 Robot, Zebruh
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Zebruh, our 2015 robot, has proven to be an incredible engineering challenge. At the center of our robot is a 72" linear slide and claw system, providing a wide range of extension from 3" off the ground to 75" at the highest limit. The elevator-style pulley system is powered by a two CIM gearbox, with spool 3D printed by our sponsor, Stratasys. The spool effectively lifts, holds and lowers the elevator cable via a position controlled PID loop. The claw is designed with hooks that, within two seconds, will grab two totes at the same time and raise both totes to complete a tower of up to five totes. The claw can also top a stack of five totes with a round "recycling" container. For a highly maneuverable drivetrain, a 6-wheeled Omni-drive was utilized with 4 wheels driving forward and in reverse. The remaining wheels are mounted perpendicular to the others, and between the front and back wheels respectively, to provide lateral movement without compromising the ability to traverse the scoring platform.





Zeke (2014)

2014 Robot, Zeke

2014 Robot, Zeke

2014 Robot, Zeke

2014 Robot, Zeke
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The Green Machine's 2014 robot, Zeke, has a mecanum drive train for optimal maneuverability. Our robot is fitted with a catapult shooter fabricated out of harpoon tubing elastic. The tubing is designed to glide smoothly over a roller 3D printed by Stratasys. Our plan is to shoot into the high goal with reasonable accuracy. Zeke also has a wheeled ball collector, which doubles as a low goal shooter. The robot is able to catch the giant exercise balls and shoot over the mid-field truss.





Zed (2013)

2013 Robot, Zed

2013 Robot, Zed

2013 Robot, Zed

2013 Robot, Zed
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The 2013 robot, Zed, built for the game Ultimate Ascent was an incredible robot for the Green Machine. This robot has a linear shooter programmed to aim for the uppermost three point goal from half field and a mecanum drive train that enables speedy maneuvering. One of the unique things about Zed is the 3-D printed augers from our sponsor, Stratasys, that allowed us to raise and lower up to three Frisbee discs stashed inside of the robot. The height adjuster for the shooter was a threaded shaft attached to a snow blower motor. Zed also used part of this mechanism used to hang from the first rung of the pyramid.

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Zephyr (2012)

2012 Robot, Zephyr

2012 Robot, Zephyr

2012 Robot, Zephyr

2012 Robot, Zephyr
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Zephyr, our 2012 FIRST Robot, aims to be both mobile and accurate when it comes to shooting the ball in REBOUND RUMBLE. The four-tread design gives Zephyr the ability to cross over the bump in the middle of the field, as well as a turn on a dime. The robot also has super-shifters, allowing for greater control which will aid in balancing alone or in tandem on the bridge. In addition, Zephyr has a street-sweeper-like ball collector in the front. We use flat, rubber stars to bring the balls into the conveyor belt system. The conveyor belt system brings the balls though the middle of the robot and up to its turntable-mounted ball shooter. With the rotating shooter on the top of the robot, Zephyr is able to aim and make shots from anywhere on the field. In tests, the shooter consistently hits its target from distances of 30+ feet! With all of these elements combined, it will make a great competition robot!

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Zeebo (2011)

2011 Robot, Zeebo

2011 Robot, Zeebo

2011 Robot, Zeebo

2011 Robot, Zeebo.
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Zeebo, our 2011 Team 1816 robot, went for both the minibot and game piece placement aspects of the LOGO MOTION game. Zeebo has a double-jointed motorized arm with pneumatic claw to place the inflated innertube game pieces on the pegboard. The arm can reach up to 126.5 inches, well in reach of the highest pegs. The drive train is made up of six-wheel drive with eight inch wheels. The two middle wheels are lowered an eighth of an inch for better turning ability. This drive train is powered by four CIM motors in two Super Shifters with a low gear of 4.167 ft/s for pushing power and a high gear of 8.334 ft/s for speed. Zaboomafoo, the minibot, uses DC motors to both reach and trigger the sensor in approximately four seconds delivered by a pneumatic deployment system affectionately called “Jericho.” The robot utilizes the new photosensors to track the lines in both the autonomous and teleoperated periods, and a camera to aid in game piece placement and minibot deployment. Zeebo and Zaboomafoo make a highly competitive team.

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Zazu (2010)

2010 Robot, Zazu

2010 Robot, Zazu

2010 Robot, Zazu

2010 Robot, Zazu
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In 2010, our team’s robot design has focused primarily on the ability to run over the speed bumps of the “Breakaway” playing field, kick a ball 50', and pull up on the mid-field tower at the end of the match.  The pull-up mechanism will support two other alliance robots.  The soccer ball will be "held" in place by a "ball magnet." The robot, nicknamed “Zazu,” is standard size (28" x 38") running parallel to the long direction.  We are using 8-wheel drive (four inline on each side) with 6" traction wheels.  These are driven by four motors and two transmissions. During normal game play, operators will be able to choose the distance that they want the robot to kick the soccer ball. Our robot will be able to kick up to 50’ in distance.

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Zeus (2009)

Zeus

Zeus, the 2009 Robot.

Zeus

Zeus, the 2009 Robot.
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The Green Machine is proud to introduce our 2009 competition robot: Zeus! Standing almost five feet tall and weighing over 110 pounds, the robot is fully capable of performing every task in FIRST Lunacy. Zeus’s chassis utilizes six drive “rover” wheels arrayed in a tank drive configuration, in addition to two tiny omni wheels, which relay velocity data to the robot’s onboard computer. With the help of this information, the robot has a programmed traction control system similar to how anti-lock brakes work in cars.

In order to more effectively collect moon rocks, Zeus’s chassis is oriented so that it is wider than it is long. This allows a sizeable opening in the front of the robot for moon rocks to be captured by a powered front roller. This front roller then transports the balls diagonally up to a vertical shaft in the rear of the robot, where the balls are then carried by another roller-conveyer system up to the shooter in the top of the robot. Combined, the ball intake and the vertical column can store up to seven game pieces. To score the balls, Zeus initially had a shooter which consisted of two sets of eight inch diameter wheels attached directly to powerful CIM motors. However, after the Wisconsin Regional, the team found that a dumper was more effective at scoring. The team detached the shooter at the end of the Wisconsin Regional and CADed and build a dumper module to attach to the robot at the Minnesota Regional, giving Zeus its current form. In a technical progression from previous years, all components of Zeus are controlled by motors rather than pneumatic pistons.

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Zerkit (2008)

Zerkit

Zerkit, the 2008 Robot.

Zerkit

Zerkit, the 2008 Robot.
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For the 2008 game FIRST Overdrive, Team 1816 worked on a design concept that involved a fork-like manipulator placed at the front of the chassis. This fork structure, attached to a four-bar linkage, controlled the trackballs, helping to guide and “herd” the balls around the track. The linkage and the fork was able to lift, or "hurdle," the nearly 10-pound, 40" diameter ball almost seven feet high, enabling the trackballs to clear the overpass, which is 6'6" above the playing field. With this manipulator, the robot- known as Zerkit - was able to consistently pick up a trackball, lift it in the air, and drop it over the overpass, a maneuver that proved very valuable during competitions. Three pneumatic cylinders power the entire manipulator, which is made of aluminum bars. The chassis of the robot is powered by four CIM motors, which are geared down through two-speed transmissions. This setup allows us to drive the robot in either low or high gear, depending on whether fine-grained control or raw speed is needed.

Hours of frustration fixing broken parts, combined with some disappointing matches during which Zerkit remained stubbornly motionless (even falling over during a practice match), all made for a rough first day of competition.

Although the design was full of promise, Zerkit didn’t perform as well as expected in the first couple matches at the 2008 Wisconsin Regional. Hours of frustration fixing broken parts, combined with some disappointing matches during which Zerkit remained stubbornly motionless (even falling over during a practice match), all made for a rough first day of competition. Despite these disheartening early setbacks, the team kept working through each problem and ultimately prevailed with Zerkit finishing preliminary rounds with a respectable qualifying record of 5-3. The team’s efforts to reach out to other teams paid off when The Green Machine advanced to the elimination rounds as part of an alliance with Team 2606-Rosemount Robotics, a rookie Minnesota team from Rosemount High School, and Team 74-Team CHAOS of Holland High School, Holland, MI. Even with an exit in the quarterfinals, The Green Machine emerged knowing they’d ironed out most every mechanical setback.

For the first time ever, the team was able to design and build a robot able to perform the most complex task demanded in the year’s game challenge.

Hopes were high going into the inaugural Minnesota Regional, and Zerkit did not disappoint. Despite two early loses to the eventual champion, Team 525-Swartdogs, Cedar Falls, IA, the robot performed admirably, scoring big points as the team won each of the next seven matches to finish the prelims at 7-2. That record made Zerkit the fourth-ranked robot, ensuring a spot in the knock-out rounds. Sadly, our team’s alliance was eliminated in the quarterfinal rounds, due in part to a mysterious power loss suffered by Zerkit at the beginning of a match.

Zerkit Lifts

Zerkit lifts a trackball.

Zerkit Lifts

Zerkit lifts a trackball.
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When Team 1816 won the regional Chairman’s Award at the Minnesota competition, Zerkit earned one last chance for glory, this time upon the Galileo field at the Championships in Atlanta. Even before the robot entered the preliminary rounds, the team knew it would be hard to advance, as all the teams in the field combined for a staggering 36 regional titles! Given all the competition, the team gave it everything they had, finishing a respectable 4-3, ending in 40th place out of about 80 teams in the Galileo division. Surrounded by remarkable robots from which to choose, The Green Machine was not selected by any of the top-seeded teams to advance to the elimination rounds. Yet, there were other bonuses to take away from Atlanta: For the first time during the 2008 season, operating in competition conditions, Zerkit actually worked properly in virtually all of its matches!

Despite its various operating problems, Zerkit proved to be The Green Machine’s most ambitious and impressive robot to date. For the first time ever, the team was able to design and build a robot able to perform the most complex task demanded in the year’s game challenge. It also marked the first time the team built a robot with a complicated manipulator. Although the robot didn’t win a competition, Zerkit’s design and construction marks a huge step forward for the team.

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Zarthan (2007)

Zarthan

Zarthan, the 2007 Robot.

Zarthan

Zarthan, the 2007 Robot.
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In 2007, our team's robot design has focused primarily on lifting the other robots on our alliance during the endgame for bonus points. We are planning to use two ramps positioned on opposite sides of the robot. During the endgame, the two other robots on our alliance will each be able to drive up a ramp and be lifted up twelve inches via pneumatics – the height required to score 60 bonus points. During normal game play, the ramps will be folded up (oriented perpendicular to the ground) which may be a useful defense to prevent other robots from placing the game pieces.

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Zorgatron (2006)

While the simple design of our five-foot tall robot, named Zorgatron, was not technically sophisicated, our robot was consistent in its performance. Zorgatron was positioned and programmed, while in the autonomous mode, to seek out the closest ground-level goal, and dump its entire cache of balls. When control of the robot went into manual mode, Zorgatron was able to defend its goals and block other robots from scoring. That consistency, combined with a cunning defensive strategy, led to a winning performance.

Zorgatron

Zorgatron, the 2006 Robot.

Zorgatron

Zorgatron, the 2006 Robot.
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Zorgotron was constructed of materials we could work with in a home setting: aluminum sheeting, plywood, PVC pipe for the frame that held the net. Built on the chassis that came with the FIRST kit, Zorgotron measured 26" x 36" x 5'. Custom wheels were purchased for IFI; we used magic sliders as nubs in the front, instead of wheels. CIM motors were used for driving.

More Facts

  • The footprint was 28" x 38"
  • The sliders in the front were machined HDPE nubs (HDPE is a type of plastic, stands for high density polyethylene).
  • The magic sliders died in the first round of the practice matches at wisconsin because the ramps tore them up.
  • The gear reduction for the drive train was 29:1 because of the monstrous wheel sprockets we bought.
  • It was designed to provide 52 lbs of pushing force.
  • It had a top speed of 6.4 ft.

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